Movies that hit home.

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videogame30

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#1
It's safe to assume that we've all seen hundreds of movies over the years. Some where good. Some where bad. And some where meh. But every now and then we'll see a movie that will effect you in ways you never expected. For me, one of those movies is The Green Mile. It made me laugh, it made me angry, and it made me cry. Every time I see the scene of John Coffey in the electric chair, I can't help but cry as if someone in my family just passed away. The type of man he is and the gift he possess. and the relationship he develops with Paul and the other officers of E-block; And then to see that scene. The inevitable lump forms in my throat and I can't help but burst into tears.

So I'm curious, what are the movies that have similar effects on you? Do they make you rage? Do they make you cheer? Do they change your outlook on life? Please share. :gleeTiggs:
 

Pontius

Katbox Forum Member
Sep 21, 2007
1,342
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#2
Avatar makes me frown, but it's not at the "destructiveness of nature". More at the fact that people buy into it like it's an accurate representation of how things are, or that people think it to be an amazing piece of cinema with a wonderful plot and that anyone who dislikes it is "heartless" or "trying to push their own agenda" or some-such (I've seen it argued on other forums that if you dislike Avatar you support genocide).

Very few movies actually, well, "move" me though. I can't think of any that's made me re-evaluate thought processes I have. Several can be used to make me smile, yes, and several can also be used to give me a temporary adrenaline rush and the like. However, I can't think of any by name (besides Avatar above) that draw anything more than passing interest, and even then the above's only going to last so long as fans try placing it on a golden pedestal.
 
Apr 26, 2007
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#4
It would have to be the movie Schindler's List. The part that always gets to me is the ending, when he is given the ring before leaving. The fact he is breaking into tears and saying "He could've saved more" always makes me tear up a little inside.
 

SoulKat

Katbox Forum Member
Apr 17, 2007
243
427
#5
While Avatar is my favorite movie, I have to agree with WT. Schindler's list has the only moment that's touched me emotionally. While the story can be summarized very quickly, in that a Nazi munitions dealer has a change of heart and works to sabotage the war effort, it was the moment in which he looks upon his own remaining wealth and equates it to the price of the lives that he could have saved. It was very touching, and a very unique moment to remember.
 

Sussoloc

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Apr 21, 2008
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#6
I'd have to say Gran Torino. It's about a retired war veteran who loses his wife and finds himself alienated from his own family, and he has to set this young boy straight who attempted to steal his car as part of an initiation to join his cousin's gang. The two actually become good friends over the course of the movie, but it isn't made any easier by his cousin's disapproval of his lifestyle.

Honestly, I find it hard to put this movie into words, but it has a lot of funny, intense, and generally heartwarming moments. I would seriously recommend seeing it.
 

Curran

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Apr 17, 2007
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#7
I have another addition here, one that a lot of people may not know if:

Rambo: First Blood, the first in the series.

Far from being the machine gun fests that the series became immediately after, the first movie in the series is remarkably powerful. And I have a secret love for showing to my more dismissive movie buff friends and seeing their minds completely change int he last quarter of the film.

(omg my posts are leet!)
 

Merrick Rose

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Apr 20, 2007
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#8
I have so many, I can't keep track. But one of my all time favorite scenes is from The Last Samurai. During the first battle with the samurai, when they charge out of the fog on their horses, it really gives you the sense that they were unstoppable warriors. Mystical, even.
 

Tivsy

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Mar 2, 2009
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#9
Like Merrick, I have a lot of those moments. But here's one I remember: The Lion King, Mufasa's Death. When he falls, then when Simba comes up to his body and starts going "Dad, wake up."

I was crying back then when I first watched it, and I can't even look at a screencap of Simba crying over his father without tearing up now.
 

Tabbitroz

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Jun 6, 2008
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#10
Like Merrick, I have a lot of those moments. But here's one I remember: The Lion King, Mufasa's Death. When he falls, then when Simba comes up to his body and starts going "Dad, wake up."
I am so glad I'm not the only one who still cries at that. :cryMora: People say that Bambi's mum's death was the saddest moment in Disney.. pah, I didn't even feel a touch of sadness at that. But actually seeing Mufasa's body and seeing little Simba desperately trying to wake him.. I'd better shut up now before I get teary-eyed again. :XDMora:
 
#11
I've seen a lot of movies, but none of them have given me any second thoughts. I grew up Military, it was a relevant part of life for me. But when I actually got up close and personal with it...

there's nothing more terrifying than walking down a street that just turns empty in four seconds and then seeing the tell-tale glint of a sniper-scope three stories up, and about two klicks down the street.

I dunno, maybe I'm heartless, or maybe I'm just immune to holly-wood's bullshit representations. But I kind of chuckle during teary moments in movies. Hell, I thought "The Hills Have Eyes" was a comedy... And the sequel was even funnier... Games on the other hand! I just couldn't be a dick in Mass Effect, it's just not what I'd do. 'Course the game does give me SOME renegade points for what I'd do, but that's just more efficient! Not because I deliberately wanted to push that guy out the window! ... Well, actually no, I did just want to push that guy out the window. But he called me bad things! So it evens out...
 

Tivsy

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Mar 2, 2009
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#12
I am so glad I'm not the only one who still cries at that. :cryMora: People say that Bambi's mum's death was the saddest moment in Disney.. pah, I didn't even feel a touch of sadness at that. But actually seeing Mufasa's body and seeing little Simba desperately trying to wake him.. I'd better shut up now before I get teary-eyed again. :XDMora:
*nods* It was Simba's little voice that did me in. I was sniffling before that but once I heard "Dad, wake up! Wake up!", I was bawling like a baby.
 

TerrificTwenty

Katbox Guitar God and Soundtrack Specialist
Katbox Patreon
#13
Best movies for me?

MST3K the Movie - Favorite TV show became a hit movie
Rush Hour 2 - The massage parlor brawl always got my adrenaline pumping
Hot Fuzz - SWAN!
Iron Man - Sometimes you gotta run before you can walk
Titan AE - Bon Bluth's best
Spaceballs - Ludicrous Speed...GO!
Mystery Men - My favorite superhero movie ever
Robocop - Oh My God! They killed Kinney!
Independence Day - Better than Men in Black
Kill Bill Volume 1 - The crazy 88's
 

wrytergirl

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Jul 23, 2008
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#16
probably Sherlock Holmes. Just because of all the detective stuff. My favorite scene is when Holmes is fighting that French giant, and he has that electric wand thing, and he zaps him. Also, how he presents all the accidents when he figures out how they were done. Yay for smart movies. :XDJoy:
 
Apr 26, 2007
3,685
336
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Arizona
#17
I realize that my first post sort of just hit on a movie that made me tear up manly tears, so I kind of gave it some more thought. :XDTaffy:

Munich
Yes, I know: same director and also a Jewish-based story like Schindler's List. However, the political context and in-depth storytelling about a government-affiliated assassin doing what he must for his country is intriguing to me.

Shawshank Redemption
Dismissing the obvious point that is Morgan Freeman's voice, this movie was just one of those that was very epic and compelling in it's story. Also, the scene where they show what difficulties the old-timer faces outside prison really hit home for me.

Reservoir Dogs
Where to begin with this one. The backwards story-telling is one. Oh, the epic scene with Mr. Blonde, a straight razor, and the song "Stuck in the Middle with You". Whatever the reason, this is up there as one of my favorite Tarantino films of all time.

O Brother Where Art Thou
This kind of goes hand-in-hand with films like the Shawshank Redemption. I mean, O Brother Where Art Thou is an amazing combination of 1930s Americana and the epic tale that is the Odyssey. Three convicts travel across the country in search of their own personal freedoms while encountering realistic variations of Odyssey-esque lore such as the cyclops (in the form of a beastly one-eyed pastor) and sirens (in the form of mysterious girls washing clothes by the river).

Lord of War
Nicholas Cage? Not awesome. A film based on one of the most notorious arms dealers in the 20th century? Very awesome. As a political nut when it comes to international gun trade and all that stuff, this movie was a dream for me. Based loosely on the real life story of Viktor Bout (infamous Ukrainian arms dealer), Cage acts as an Ukrainian immigrant who finds his American Dream-esque rise to glory through selling guns on a global scale and suffers the real-life implications of such. The method of narration and the subject matter are what got me here.

Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels
Have that rather sketchy, noones-heard-of-it film or that movie that people just plain forgot? This is it and I loved it with a passion. Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels tells the awkward tale of four London riff-raffs - a card shark, a pair of con artists, and a chef - who pool together for an underground poker game with high stakes. When they end up being cheated out of winning, they find themselves in-debt £500,000 (roughly $760,000) or risk losing their fingers, then one of their dad's bar, and finally their lives if they don't pay up. Comedic crime ensues as a result. One of my favorite British-esque films.

A Beautiful Mind
Russel Crowe's best movie, in my opinion. It tells the story of real-life mathematician John Nash, as he lives his life as a professor at the prestigious Princeton University. However, he slowly finds things going surreal when his mathematical genius is called upon by the US government in the battle against threats such as communism and the Jewish conspiracy. Later, we reveal John's real battle is not using math against the Ruskies, but rather struggling to balance his life, his genius, and his newly-discovered schizophrenia. A movie that hits home for me because of it's sad nature and intriguing depth.
 
Sep 21, 2009
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#18
[quote author=Genesis Monk link=topic=5207.msg135330#msg135330 date=1267977902]
Turner and Hooch.

I don't want to spoil it, because it's more powerful when you don't even see it coming, but if you watch it, you are going to cry by the ending.
[/quote]I just caught the ending to that movie this morning, and I almost cried.
 

videogame30

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Dec 7, 2007
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#19
[quote author=White Tiger link=topic=5207.msg135333#msg135333 date=1267979104]
O Brother Where Art Thou
This kind of goes hand-in-hand with films like the Shawshank Redemption. I mean, O Brother Where Art Thou is an amazing combination of 1930s Americana and the epic tale that is the Odyssey. Three convicts travel across the country in search of their own personal freedoms while encountering realistic variations of Odyssey-esque lore such as the cyclops (in the form of a beastly one-eyed pastor) and sirens (in the form of mysterious girls washing clothes by the river).[/quote]

Another one of my faves as well. I can't stop quoting it. XD I'm not too familiar with The Odyssey, so I'm wondering, who does the Bounty Hunter represent?

I'm enjoying what everyone's posting so far. I'm going to have to check some of these movies out. :gleeTaffy:
 
Apr 26, 2007
3,685
336
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Arizona
#23
Another one of my faves as well. I can't stop quoting it. XD I'm not too familiar with The Odyssey, so I'm wondering, who does the Bounty Hunter represent?
Theoretically, the bounty hunter/jailer that you see who is consistently after them could, more-or-less, represent Poseidon. In the Odyssey, Poseidon is angry at Odysseus for taking all the credit to himself for slaughtering the Trojans alongside Agamemnon, Menelaus, and the other Greek kings. The reality was that many events that lead to the Greek victory in the Trojan War were, in fact, done with the help of Poseidon.

So, in order to punish Odysseus and his men, Poseidon captured some of the wind's power so it would now blow the ships off course. The result would be Odysseus and his men being lost for all eternity. This, theoretically, is the same for the bounty hunter/jailer - always trying to cut the boys off.
 

Captain Video

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Sep 4, 2009
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#24
I'm going with George Romero's original Dawn of the Dead (I liked the remake too, but for different reasons.) It's a movie that really got everything right, both because of luck and coordination. Romero's core idea - that people will seek freedom from the worst of times in the pettiest of desires - is brilliant, and it happens to coordinate nicely with the glorious consumer tackiness of the 1970s. Powerful in both what is said and what is not, Dawn of the Dead is still one of my all-time favorite films (a shortlist of three).